Artist Feature: Kora Zorman

Today we are talking to artist Kora Zorman – you can see more of her paintings in Shaw Creative Art Collective, available here!

Q: Introduce yourself! Could you describe your process?
A:
Let me say first – I can’t really call myself a painter or artist. Perhaps it would better fit to say I’m an “aesthetist”. While I rarely know where blank canvas will lead me, I see the process as some sort of translation – it is the emotion which I try to translate into colors and shapes. As probably the most of the people that deal with this type of expression, you know exactly when translation worked and when whatever you have been working on is finished…when there is nothing to add (another indication is “Do not touch!” by people around me 🙂 ).

Another half of the puzzle is communication, or lack of it…When you look around, you realize that communication around us is quite strange recently… or it has changed a lot. Somehow, I feel a need to communicate more, to break the isolation that modern life dictates, so in a way, my work is also attempt to reach out, talk, and say things you rarely have a chance to say to others.541dbbb973bdb795be2ced5b72e70623

Bottom line is very simple – I can afford to be the only juror, so if I would not put something on my walls, such work will not go in public. I clearly do this for myself, so I do not need to follow any specific guidelines, standards, or techniques – it’s one of the rare fields where one does not need to compromise the freedom …you can be what you really are.

I use acrylics—it suits very well my character I think… it’s intense and it dries very fast, so there is no time for second thought or calculation. Recently I also discovered some digital techniques which I am exploring at the moment and soon some of this work will also be presented. I have interesting series of posters I would like to see in my room and which I intend to print in one copy only. Mass media with signature 🙂

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
A: 
They know what they need and they know what they like. So there is no reason to influence or change this, better to complement and try to show something fresh. What I would like to say is that there is a lot of hype around the art, value of art, not a beauty or emotion art actually presents. I feel people should start understanding that every roombeceadbfe52505820748011c53372f12 should have a piece of art they like, not the one they were told is good. You do not need to buy 1 out of 100.000 copies, the same one as your neighbor has…you can find and get original piece that makes sense and means something to you… art is not reserved for elite.

In music or visual arts you can find today so much creativity outside of the establishment and I think this shows the real pulse and picture of the world as it really is. People should explore more of these kinds of things.

Q: Where can we find more of you?
A: 
There are so many ways to promote and present the work these days. But between too many and none there is not much of a difference, cyberspace is cluttered. That is why I decided to put my artwork only on very few places. Pinterest, and use few companies and galleries I have a great respect and feel they stand for right things (yes, Shaw Creative is the one I hope to work with for long time). Things moved recently, so some works ended in private collections, some possibly will soon… It’s exciting to try to find your way out of the crowd and enjoying small successes along the road is possibly bringing me more satisfaction than reaching the destination itself.

Pinterest
Houzz
Google+

 

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Artist Feature: Art Iz Muzik For The Eyez

Today’s interview is with Antwan, also known as Art Iz Muzik For The Eyez. He is both an artist and DJ, and is sharing the process behind his bold Calligraffiti paintings.

Q: Introduce yourself!
A: 
Hi, my name is Antwan I’m a self-taught artist. Graffiti, Abstract Art, American & Japanese Calligraffiti, Stencils & Music are the styles of art that I mainly use to express my creative side. Art and music are my ways of escape, to release the stress of life.

Q: Could you describe your process?
A: Sometimes my creative process is different, 4but basically I like to begin by choosing the colors that I would like to use.  Next I choose the medium that I want [Ex. Canvas, paper etc.]. I usually work with canvas, paper, acrylics, markers & stencils. After I have figured all of that out, I’ll lay all of my materials out in front of me, put my iPod on, and see what pops into my head.  Sometimes I’ll look through my notebooks and skim through some of the ideas that I have written down for inspiration.  Once I have an idea that I want to work on, I’ll finally start creating!

When the piece is finished, I like to hold up my art and examine it.  I look for parts that I love, stuff I’m getting better at, and things I need to improve on.  For the final step, I’ll try to think of a name for the piece.  I put my artist signature on the front; add the title, what number it is, and my signature to the back… FINISHED, hahahaha!2

There are a few artists that have really influenced me and my art. First off is Vance Kirkland.  I’ll never forget the first time I saw his work.  I went to the Denver Art Museum and was drawn to the abstract art; most of it was work by Kirkland.  After seeing his art, I decided to give it a try. After finishing my first five or so pieces, I started showing people to get their opinion. Everyone said that my art reminded them of Jackson Pollock [I had no clue who he was at the time].  I looked him up and really liked his style.

Another artist that has influenced me is Martin Klimas.  When I first saw his “Painting with Sound” series, I fell in love with his use of vibrant colors. One of my favorite artists is the founder of Calligraffiti, Niel “Shoe” Meuman.  I’ve always been a fan of graffiti, hand styles, and calligraphy.  Mueman was the first person that I’ve seen mix those styles of typography so well.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
A: 
If you get some time for yourself to sit and listen to music, check out some of my mixes on Mixcloud & some of my beats on SoundCloud.

Q: Where can we find more of you?1
A: 
I’m always working on & posting new paintings, mixes and beats. If you are interested in seeing more of my work you can find my stuff here:

Etsy Shop
SoundCloud
Art Twitter: @MuzikForTheEyez
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Dj Twitter: DjDoinBad
Dj Facebook
Mixcloud

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Artist Feature: Dara Engler

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Today we are talking to Dara Engler of Ithaca, New York – you can see more of her character in Shaw Creative Art Collective, available now!

Q: Introduce yourself!
A:
My name is Dara Engler and my work depicts the evolution of a character, from lethargic and zombie-like to an ornery, striped pirate. She is more alert, and as a result more grumpy, as though waking up on the wrong side of the bed.

Q: Could you describe your process?
A:
 I love fiction. This body of work was initially inspired by the four years I spent in Louisiana and by Karen Russell’s book,“St. Lucy’s Home For Girls Raised By Wolves.” The pirate adopted the curiosity of Russell’s characters. I have since moved to upstate New York where my character is learning to tie nautical knots, spearfishing for sea lamprey and skinning squirrels. She is developing into an explorer, running into new creatures in new lands.

My work has transitioned from singular portraits to a more storybook narrative,
embracing adventure and human foible. It is unclear whether the figure is outside or whether the background is a backdrop in an imagined space. My work plays with flatness, pattern and line juxtaposed with the rendered form. The paintings teeter between real and imagined worlds, between fact and fiction.
I use myself as a model, holding the poses in front dengler-webof a mirror. I enjoy collecting and building props for the paintings. I think the next steps in my process will be finding a way to incorporate these objects and sets into my exhibitions alongside the oil paintings and drawings.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
A:
I feel lucky to teach painting and drawing at Ithaca College. There is nothing more stimulating to my own art practice than surrounding myself with young adults learning materials and techniques for the first time.

Q: Where can we find more of you?
A:
 www.daraengler.com

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Artist Feature: Matt Ordiway

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Today we are speaking with Matt Ordiway, who describes himself as a psychedelic artist. We are featuring his colorful marker pieces in our first Art Collective book, available now!

Q: Introduce yourself!
A:
 Without sounding too much like I’m at an AA meeting…I’m Matt, and I’m a psychedelic artist. I’ve always loved music, but for the longest time I never really ‘got’ visual art. I remember going to the Chicago Museum of Art with my High School’s band and being somewhat depressed that I couldn’t see what everyone was gawking at. I just walked from piece to piece trying to look interested. It wasn’t until I got to college that I met a friendmordiway-web2 who introduced me to psychedelic medicines (I say that because ‘drugs’ has such a nasty connotation to it, and because they were a medicine for me). My first few trips were on the ungodly, bitter little devils known as morning glory seeds. It was like trying to look at the Great Barrier Reef while wearing a rusty, old fashioned diving suit from Scooby Doo. But that tiny glimpse was enough to get my foot in the door of wonder.

As I started to pry that door open inch by inch I began to feel this odd anxiety. At the time I assumed it was a result of me temporarily depleting my serotonin, and it probably was. However, I like to think of it as the whole of all the art, music, and poetry I had consumed up to that point dying to pour out as something new. When I finally got my hand on some psilocybin mushrooms, the food of the gods, I flung wonder’s door so far open that I had no choice but to start creating. As I was dissolving into the chaos of the psilocybin I had ingested my friend handed me a book and some sharpies. I began scribbling the kind of nonsense you would expect from someone on drugs, and it was a beautifully liberating experience.

Matt0098Q: Could you describe your process?
A:
 Depending on what I’m making I start a piece in a few different ways. If it’s pastel I’ll just go and see what it becomes. I usually only use pastels when I’m on a psychedelic because my sober mind will usually try to make it into something it’s not which results in a boring blob of color. With stained glass style sharpie drawings it varies. If I have something very particular in mind I start with pencil to make sure I get everything as close as possible to what I’m imagining. Otherwise I just sit down with a black sharpie and begin with the outlines. For my piece ‘Lysergic’ I just started and it became what it is. With the concentric lines I just seed it with something like a dot or line and go from there. Recently I’ve been working with mixing paints just enough to make a psychedelic pattern. With that it’s more of a case of me enjoying mixing the colors. What it is at the end is just one image of it.

Generally the process of making one piece is the seed for the next one. Sometimes a friend suggests something. Other times it is something that occurred to me on a psychedelic trip. It can even be an old piece that I want to redo. However it comes, I usually try to find an idea that excites me before the current one is done. When I do find myself in the dead space between ideas I grab some scrap paper and experiment with patterns until I stumble across an idea that seems solid enough to base a piece around.
mordiway-web
Something that sometimes bothers me is the fact that I can’t really do a lot of the things that most people think an artist should be able to do. Things like drawing faces and painting landscapes. Then I realize that I’ve only been doing this for about 9 months and that I have plenty of time to learn those basic techniques and incorporate them into my work.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
A: I feel like every artist, and by that I mean everybody, has a duty to be constantly creating. Don’t just sit there and consume, consume, consume. Put out what you can. Carpentry, needlepoint, industrial noise music, street art, whatever you can do. Hell, next time you’re at a restaurant ask for some crayons and paper. Doodle to your heart’s content even if that’s just a big red circle. Make the waiter think, for a fraction of a second, something that they never would have thought without you.

Q: Where can we find more of you?
A:
 I’m MuseicalArt everywhere, but here are the links.Part 3

I post all of my stuff on Deviant Art at museicalart.deviantart.com. If you’d like any prints just leave a comment on the piece and I’ll get a high res image uploaded ASAP.
I’m doing some ambient soundscape type stuff on Sound Cloud so…
https://soundcloud.com/matt-ordiway-1

The Big 3
Twitter – https://twitter.com/museicalart
Instagram – http://instagram.com/museicalart/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/museicalart

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Artist Feature: Lucie Duban

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Today’s artist interview is with Lucie Duban of Spain. Her oil paintings are going to be featured in Shaw Creative Art Collective, available now!

Q: Introduce yourself!lduban-web
A:
My name is Lucie Duban. I live and work in Madrid.
I mainly use oil on stretched canvas. In early works, it was also mixed sometimes with some acrylic. I use brushes most of the time.

Q: Could you describe your process?
A:
I don’t work from sketches as I like to be fresh in front of a painting. Each one of my work is totally unique, as I try to avoid any auto-imitation. Therefore, each painting takes a while to be done. I don’t have any idea of the outcome when I start painting. It’s a journey. I tend to listen to the painting during the process and see where and how the next move has to be done in order to achieve a wholeness with movement in a balanced way.

In my drawings I use different techniques to see the outcomes. It keeps me free to experiment while hoping for some serendipity to see something fresh appearing.

As for my inspiration, my true masters are definitely Arshile Gorky and Odilon Redon. I deeply adore their work: for the vibrations, the colours, the style, the stories.

I am also a big admirer of Marc Chagall, Kandinsky, Frida Kahlo, Wols and Matisse.

As for challenges/dreams, I would love to paint a big mural painting and have the crazy chance to create the stage set for a dance ballet with big painted panels for instance.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?LucieDuban_Tout là haut
A:
Let’s just hope to see more and more good art out there to refresh our minds and souls from the industrial and too-targeted driven art that has been offered lately. And I would add that: Painting is not dead. The day it dies, it will because the last human being would have died the day prior.

Q: Where can we find more of you?
A:
You can find me here: www.lucieduban.com
My contact: lucieduban@gmail.com
Facebook: lucie.duban.7

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